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Garden for Butterflies & Bees

air date: September 28, 2019

Let’s give butterflies and bees a helping hand as habitats diminish. Certified Master Naturalist Drake White of The Nectar Bar, a native plant landscaping company in San Antonio, steps us through easy ways to turn our gardens into year-long habitats. On tour in San Antonio, Christine and Richard Alcorta’s cinder block vegetable garden on rocky soil did the trick to attract pollinators for year-long harvests.  Find out when to fertilize fruit trees and what’s troubling a persimmon and fig tree with Jim Kamas, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension fruit specialist. Do your indoor succulents look a little sickly? Monique Capanelli of Articulture Designs shows how to diagnose the problem.

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Episode Segments

On Tour

Cinder Block Vegetable Garden: Christine and Richard Alcorta

How can you grow organic food on rocky soil? Christine and Richard Alcorta solved the problem with a cinder block design for year-long harvests that end up in Richards’s 5-star recipes.

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Interview

Garden for Butterflies & Bees: Drake White

Let’s give butterflies and bees a helping hand as habitats diminish. Certified Master Naturalist Drake White of The Nectar Bar, a native plant landscaping company in San Antonio, steps us through easy ways to turn our gardens into year-long habitats. Host: Tom Spencer. Find out more at www.centraltexasgardener.org.

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Question of the Week

Should I fertilize my fruit trees in fall?

“It’s probably not a good idea to fertilize fruit trees in fall,” says Texas A&M AgriLife Extension fruit specialist Jim Kamas.  

 Nitrogen and fall rains can trigger a new flush of vegetative growth that can leave the plants very susceptible to winter injury.

You can fertilize in late winter. In Fredericksburg, Jim likes to put nitrogen down after Thanksgiving when it’s cooler and the plants aren’t prone to grow, but typically fertilizers are applied in the spring. 15-5-10 is generally the best idea. Ideally, get a soil analysis or even leaf analysis to determine the specific fertilizer needs. But in general, a 15-5-10 (or similar ratio high in nitrogen) is good. 

Check out Texas AgriLife Extension Fruit & Nut Resources for details about varieties and cultivation.   

 

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Backyard Basics

Succulent Plant Problems: Monique Capanelli Articulture Designs

Do your indoor succulents look a little sickly? Monique Capanelli of Articulture Designs shows how to diagnose the problem. See how to tell if your plant needs more water or less, and whether it’s getting too much sun or not enough light.

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