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Planting in a Post-Wild World: Thomas Rainer

air date: October 5, 2019

How do we create nature and resilient, emotionally-resonant landscapes in planned environments? Thomas Rainer, Phyto Studio landscape architect, explores concepts from his book, Planting in a Post-Wild World: Designing Plant Communities for Resilient Landscapes.  In Dripping Springs, home, family, and native plant habitat come together for Leah and Jon Gillum. Daphne shows off our viewer’s remarkable finds, including snail eggs and a closeup look at a hummingbird nest from eggs to nestlings. In John’s garden mailbox, you won’t find junk mail, just a useful stash of tools and supplies right where when you need them.

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Episode Segments

On Tour

Uniting Home, Family, and Wildlife: Leah & Jon Gillum

In Dripping Springs, home, family, and native plant habitat come together for Leah and Jon Gillum.Close to the house, a dry creek bed fends off stormwater flooding while sporting drought tolerant native plants. A cedar post and hog panel fence corral an organic vegetable garden, framed with plants for wildlife. The family-project courtyard garden offers restful views even from indoors. With 10 acres beyond their back porch, getting acquainted with all the resident wildlife is part of their daily routine, along with outdoor living under ancient oak trees.

 

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Interview

Planting in a Post-Wild World: Thomas Rainer

How do we create nature and resilient, emotionally-resonant landscapes in planned environments? Thomas Rainer, Phyto Studio landscape architect, explores concepts from his book, Planting in a Post-Wild World: Designing Plant Communities for Resilient Landscapes. Host: John Hart Asher.

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Question of the Week

What are these white things in my container?

This white cluster in a container are snail eggs! Thanks to Wizzie Brown, Travis County entomologist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, for this ID.

And, Terry Hockens spied a hefty caterpillar on a recent hike. Unlike some insect larvae, this big guy wasn’t hard to miss! Terry noticed it was munching on a vine that was growing into a mountain cedar. With a definite resemblance to our dreaded tomato hornworm, we suspect that this is the larvae of one of the many species of Sphinx moths native in our area.

In advance of the fall hummingbird migration, Amy Acosta-Welch built a special perch for tiny pollinators to rest and take a load off.

From Canyon Lake, Carie Wade documented an amazing photographic sequence of a nesting hummingbird. She catches the mother peeking out of the tiny nest. Later, Carie gets a shot of the eggs. And then, before you know it, one has already hatched and is eagerly awaiting food!

 Hummingbirds love desert willow trees for their huge, tubular flowers. From New Braunfels, Mary and Rick Trujillo sent us a picture of their beautiful tree centered in their drought-tough garden. 

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