menu

social

currently in Austin

the show

Adventures with Sharon Lovejoy & San Antonio Artists

air date: January 25, 2020

Let’s take the kids (and us) on an adventure outdoors! Author and illustrator Sharon Lovejoy warms our hearts with time-honored fun for all ages to create wonder and respect for the world around us.  In San Antonio, Maria and David Guerrero put a new spin on an old garden with artistic patterns and revived cast-offs. Daphne explores freeze damage on citrus and ficus and shows off viewer discoveries. Master Gardener Sheryl Williams plays matchmaker with companion plants and explains which ones don’t get along. 

tags:

Episode Segments

On Tour

Romantic, Whimsical Art in San Antonio Garden: Maria and David Guerrero

In San Antonio’s historic Monticello Park, artists Maria and David Guerrero put a new spin on an old garden with artistic patterns and revived cast-offs.

Watch more "On Tour" videos on YouTube →

Interview

Finding Wonder with Sharon Lovejoy

Let’s take the kids (and us) on an adventure outdoors! Author and illustrator Sharon Lovejoy warms our hearts with time-honored fun for all ages to create wonder and respect for the world around us. Host: John Hart Asher.

Watch more CTG Interview videos on YouTube →

Question of the Week

Freeze Damage Citrus and Ficus

I’d forgotten to move two cherished plants out of the cold on a recent extra-frosty night. My patio citrus is a ‘Bumper’ Satsuma, and bounced back rather quickly. The top leaves, which were most exposed, are now simply curled, while the lower sections of the plant, naturally protected by the upper portions, show no damage at all.

My ficus tree was not so lucky. It normally resides on a protected area of my front porch, and I rarely bring it inside, even on the coldest of nights. But I forgot that I’d moved it over to a sunnier spot recently, where it was more exposed to wind and cold, and the top of it is now completely desiccated and dead. But, like the citrus, the lower portions are undamaged. I plan to prune out the dead sections to reinvigorate new growth once spring arrives, and this tropical tree will bounce back just fine.

Watch more Question of the Week videos on YouTube →

Comments