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Fantastic Ferns for Indoors & Garden

air date: June 22, 2019

In the house, in the garden, or charming up hanging baskets, there’s a fern for you! Get a sampling of ferns you may never have met with Darla Harris from Fern Plantation Nursery, including indoor plants for low humidity and outdoor plants that can take the heat. Sadly, rose rosette disease has moved into Texas. Get Daphne’s answer on replanting when plants have been infected. Stir up a refreshing quinoa tabbouleh with Molly Pikarsky, Flora & Fauna Manager at Lake Austin Spa. On tour, Pat and Tom Ellison didn’t want an ordinary yard. See how they fit their design ideas into an old neighborhood while controlling runoff and attracting wildlife.

Episode Segments

On Tour

Basic Yard to Beautiful Designs: Tom and Pat Ellison

Like many new gardeners, Pat and Tom Ellison started with containers. When they bought a house, their passion kept growing. Now, they’ve got as many outdoor rooms as they have inside. Over the years, they’ve added and amended since they hauled their first load of soil or turned their first salvage into garden art.

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Interview

Fantastic Ferns Indoors & Out

In the house, in the garden, or charming up hanging baskets, there’s a fern for you! Get a sampling of ferns you may never have met with Darla Harris from Fern Plantation Nursery, including indoor plants for low humidity and outdoor plants that can take the heat.

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Question of the Week

My rose plants have rose rosette disease. Can I replant?

Unfortunately, we’re beginning to hear from more viewers that dreaded rose rosette has found its way to their gardens. Dick Peterson, conservation and environmental expert, and former Texas Rose Rustler, reports that the disease has struck his antique roses, like Martha Gonzales. He’s noticed that Knock Out roses in his Round Rock neighborhood are succumbing, too.

Dr. Kevin Ong, Director of The Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Texas A&M, has seen first-hand how this issue wipes out entire swaths of roses as it marches across the map, so we asked him for suggestions on replanting.

The newest research indicates that rose rosette is spread by eriophyid mites. Dr. Ong suggests waiting at least a month, because many roses produce suckers from the roots, a source of infected tissue, which can be picked up and spread by new eriophyid mites.

Also, be cautious about replanting roses in areas such as Dallas/Fort Worth, parts of Oklahoma, and other areas of the countries where many roses have succumbed to rose rosette. Disease prevalence is very high in these areas, so re-infestation is quite likely.

Find out more about rose rosette disease, view a map of its spread, and add your information to assist research.

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