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Meet Judy Seaborn of Botanical Interests Seeds

air date: May 25, 2019

Big dreams come in small packages! At any nursery and online, I bet you’ve selected Botanical Interests flower and vegetable seeds for their non-GMO commitment. Get co-founder Judy Seaborn’s passionate story behind her dream along with need-to-know tips for successful seed planting (and a yummy family favorite recipe you simply must try). On tour at Community First! Village, formerly homeless residents are growing new lives through gardens. Daphne contributes to seed-starting success and highlights viewers’ garden discoveries. Jeff Pavlat from the Austin Cactus & Succulent Society shows how to make your own succulent potting mix along with tips to fertilize and water.

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Episode Segments

On Tour

Formerly Homeless Growing Gardens & Community

Genesis Gardens at Community First! Village, a Mobile Loaves & Fishes planned community for the formerly homeless, grows good health along with dignity. When Alan Graham, found and CEO of Mobile Loaves & Fishes, set out to nourish body and soul, he expanded his vision to a vibrant homestead where community partners helped make it come true. Now, instead of fast food, residents nurture good organic food they grow themselves, eat fresh eggs from their chickens, and tend cheese-making goats.

Watch more "On Tour" videos on YouTube →

Interview

Botanical Interests Seeds with Judy Seaborn

Big dreams come in small packages! At any nursery and online, I bet you’ve selected Botanical Interests flower and vegetable seeds for their non-GMO commitment. Get co-founder Judy Seaborn’s passionate story behind her dream along with need-to-know tips for successful seed planting (and a yummy family favorite recipe you simply must try).

Watch more CTG Interview videos on YouTube →

Question of the Week

How to Plant Seeds

It’s not too late to seed warm weather plants.

As a general guideline, plants that have larger seeds, such as beans, pumpkins, corn, and squash, are good choices for direct-seeding.

FLOWER SEEDS TO PLANT IN LATE MAY AND JUNE:  zinnias, cosmos, sunflowers, celosia, four-o’clock, moonflower, morning glory, tithonia (Mexican sunflower).

VEGETABLE PLANTING GUIDE

Soil temperatures need to be warm enough for germination, and seeds should be planted about twice as deep as their size, in moist garden soil. If your soil has dried out after the rains, moisten it well before planting.

When they first emerge, seedlings have a single rootlet, so keeping the growing area moist without drowning them is critical. This may mean gentle watering more than once a day, and potentially also protection from the harsh sun and wind until they’ve grown a bit and won’t dry out as easily.

Also, there are many insects that love the taste of tender new seedlings, so be sure to research how to protect your seedlings from any potential predators before you start. Avoid mulching directly near the seeds until they are established.

There’s lots of new life in the garden if you watch for it.  Nancy Donner discovered these Monarch chrysalids, an exciting adventure to watch as they emerge—if you’re there at the right time!

In Marble Falls, Kate Marr discovers new lessons all the time in her dear mother in law, Rhonda Marr’s garden. Kate claims that she’s an amateur but has found a great mentor to teach her and hopefully also pass along family plants!

In Waco this spring, Sheila Smith’s columbines lined both sides of her pathway beyond her rose arbor. Once columbines bloom out, let the seeds dry, then collect or leave a little longer, to scatter themselves. After seed heads are completely dry, cut the stems down to the rosette.

In College Station, Keisha and David Lamb participated in Texas A&M’s Big Event. Since its introduction in 1982, The Big Event has become the largest, one-day, student-run service project in the nation. Each spring, tens of thousands of Texas A&M students come together to say “Thank You” to the residents of Bryan and College Station. For the past 38 years, Aggie students have participated in this annual event to show their appreciation to the surrounding community, completing service projects such as yard work, window washing, and painting for residents of the community. Although The Big Event has grown over the years, the message and mission remains the same – to simply say “Thank You.” Keisha and David’s team was the group “Society for Conservation Biology”, where students had a great time working in their garden and identifying every bug, worm, and frog they came across. Their Lynx spider on a David Austin ‘Prince’ rose was a big hit! Thank you for sharing, Keisha and David!

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