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Nature’s Medicine Cabinet: Lone Star Nursery

air date: May 11, 2019

Grow for good health with Flint Fancy from grower Lone Star Nursery who fills your garden medicine chest with unique plants you may never have met! Daphne examines a troubled mountain laurel. Paint a rain barrel to pretty it up and prevent algae with Daniel Cunningham, Horticulturist/Program Coordinator at Texas A&M AgriLife Research—Dallas. On tour, Jeff Breitenstein and Skottie O’Mahony’s Tanglewild Garden’s a state of mind as much as a design, botanical, and daylily hybridizing adventure.

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Episode Segments

On Tour

Daylilies, Moroccan Courtyard, Outdoor Oasis: Jeff Breitenstein & Skottie O’Mahony

Jeff Breitenstein and Skottie O’Mahony’s Tanglewild Garden’s a state of mind as much as a design, botanical, and daylily hybridizing adventure. After trading Seattle for Austin, they renovated a 1970s house and bland setting into a Moroccan-styled courtyard, moon garden, and intimate outdoor living framed by leafy and colorful plants. Members of the Austin Daylily Society and an American Daylily Society official display garden, discover how they propagate and grow over 1000 cultivars of drought-hardy, edible daylilies. Deeply inspired by plants and global experiences with Jeff, Skottie’s taken his imaginative digital art online as custom-designed SkotoArt.

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Question of the Week

Troubled mountain laurel.

Laura Mumme writes for help with her struggling mountain laurel. It’s about 10 years old and was in beautiful bloom this spring, but now looks terrible.

Although I can’t tell for sure from these photos, it does appear from the shape of the small branches that your tree is probably not receiving enough sun. Also, there are other plants growing around the base of your mountain laurel and the bed seems to be surrounded by a St.  Augustine lawn, both of which will increase relative humidity and thus encourage insect and microbial issues on plants that prefer a drier environment.

Without a change in the microclimate, your tree may continue to decline. To start, prune out any dead limbs and remove all of the surrounding plants to give the interior of the tree space for air to circulate.

Mountain laurels prefer full sun, so if you can prune the canopy of any trees blocking sun from above your mountain laurel, that would also help.

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